If You Liked Britt-Marie Was Here, You Might Also Like…

Britt Marie Was HereLast year, the HPB Book Club read A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, which I considered to be the best book I read last year.  Needless to say, I was excited when I learned our April/May Book Club selection was Fredrik Backman’s Britt-Marie Was Here! While I don’t know yet if it will be the best book I read this year (as the year is far from over), I will say it’s the best book I’ve read so far this year. Backman’s ability to write a typically dislikable character into someone the reader not only likes but also can’t help but cheer for is masterful.  When you meet Britt-Marie in the unemployment office, her judgmental, prudish attitude makes you sympathize with the clearly astonished employment office worker, but as the book progresses and you learn more about Britt-Marie and how she became the way she is—as well as immerse yourself in the community of Borg, “of which the kindest thing one can say is that it has a road going through it”—you can’t help but love Britt-Marie for all the things you disliked about her before.

If you, like me, loved Britt-Marie Was Here, here are a few other books you may also love: Continue reading

If You Liked The Girl on the Train, You Might Also Like…

trainIf you’re a part of the HPB Book Club, you are currently reading or perhaps just finished The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins. This psychological thriller is told through the perspective of three different women who have one very dangerous thing in common—they are all living a lie. In the book, Megan Hipwell is found dead and Rachel, who has secretly watched Megan’s life from the safety of the passing commuter train, believes she can solve Megan’s murder. From the moment The Girl on the Train was released, people have compared it to Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn, and with its suspenseful plot and surprise ending, they are not wrong. However, if you have already read Gone Girl and are looking for other books like The Girl on the Train, you may like some of these.

1. The Luckiest Girl Alive, by Jessica Knoll 2. The Good Girl, by Mary Kubica 3. Behind Closed Doors, by B.A. Paris 4. The Silent Wife, by A.S.A. Harrison 5. Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty 6. Before I Go To Sleep, by S.J. Watson 7. Truly, Madly, Guilty, by Liane Moriarty 8. The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware 9. The Couple Next Door, by Shari Lapena 10. Elizabeth is Missing, by Emma Healey

I’ve already snapped up two of these books. What about you? What are you reading next?

Julie is Traffic Manager at Half Price Books Corporate.
You may follow her on Twitter at @auntjewey.

If You Liked A Man Called Ove, You Might Also Like…

If you’re part of the HPB Book Club, you are currently reading or perhaps just finished A Man Called Ove, by Fredrik Backman, a heartwarming story about a cranky old man who, through a series of humorous yet touching events, learns to open his heart to those around him and that his life still has meaning. When I finished the book, I wanted to start reading it all over again. If you enjoyed A Man Called Ove as much as I did, here are a few other books you might also like.

1. My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry, by Fredrik Backman
2. Britt-Marie Was Here, by Fredrik Backman
3. The Little Paris Bookshop, by Nina George
4. The Invoice, by Jonas Karlssonlarge
5. Our Souls at Night, by Kent Haruf
6. The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper, by Phaedra Patrick
7. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, by Jonas Jonasson
8. The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden, by Jonas Jonasson
9. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, by Rachel Joyce
10. The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy, by Rachel Joyce
11. Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand, by Helen Simonson

Well, I have already picked up the other two Backman novels to read, but I will definitely start looking for the rest of the books on this list. So, what are you reading next?

Julie is Traffic Manager at Half Price Books Corporate.
You may follow her on Twitter at @auntjewey.

If you like The Magicians, you might also like…

If you are part of the HPB Book Club, you are currently reading or perhaps just finished The Magicians, by Lev Grossman. This smart fantasy novel pays homage to several fantasy classics while working under the premise that magic is hard and to practice magic, you must have an emotional instability. The main character, Quentin Coldwater, is a genius, who likes to perform card tricks, but is depressed. Then, he is “invited” to take the entrance exam into Brakebills College for Magical Pedagogy. Grossman gives a literary nod to Harry Potter, The Lord of the Rings and The Chronicles of Narnia (through the magical land of Fillory) in this book. So, if you like any of these books, you might want to give The Magicians a try. Here are a few other books, you may like as well:

American Gods, by Neil Gaiman
Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, by Susanna Clarke
So You Want to be a Wizard, by Diane Duane
Storm Front, by Jim Butcher
The Coldest War, by Ian Tregillis

So, what is your next read?

Julie is Traffic Manager at Half Price Books Corporate.
You may follow her on Twitter at @auntjewey.

 

If You Like “The Fault in Our Stars,” You Might Also Like…

If you (like me) loved reading The Fault in our Stars by John Green, here are a couple of other similar books you might also enjoy.

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews

This winner of the 2012 Cybil Award for Young-Adult Fiction and the 2013 Westchester Fiction Award is about Greg Gaines, a socially invisible senior who only has one friend, Earl.  Greg and Earl spend their time playing video games and making their own movies.  Then Greg’s mother forces him to befriend Rachel, who has leukemia. However, when Rachel decides to stop her treatment, Greg and Earl must give up their invisible status and make a stand.

The Probability of Miracles by Windy Wunder

Sixteen-year-old Cam Cooper has spent the last seven years in and out of hospitals, but her mother and half-sister won’t accept that Cam’s cancer is terminal. So they decide to move 1,500 miles away to Promise, Maine, a town known for the miraculous events that occur there. Cam wants none of it, but she can’t deny the strange things that happen in Promise.  I’d tell you more, but I don’t want to give anything away.

As you may know The Fault in our Stars was dedicated to Esther Earl, a sixteen-year-old girl who passed away from cancer in 2010. Today, the book This Star Won’t Go Out: The Life and Words of Esther Grace Earl has been released.  This book is a collection of journals, fiction, letters and sketches of the late Ester Grace Earl.  If you are looking for other non-fiction titles like This Star Won’t Go Out, here are a couple you might want to check out.

Poster Child: A Memior by Emily Rapp

Emily Rapp was born with a congenital defect that required her to have her left foot amputated at the age of four.  She also became the smiling, indefatigable poster child for the March of Dimes, spending her childhood traveling around the country making appearances and giving pep talks.  Emily writes about her trouble finding artificial legs that can keep up with her activity level and how her disability has impacted her entire life.

 

Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy

At age nine, Lucy Grealy was diagnosed with a potentially terminal cancer.  After a surgery in which doctors removed a third of her jaw, she returned to school to face the cruel taunts of her classmates.  She writes movingly about what it’s like to want to be loved for who you are and at the same time desperately wanting to be perfect, a contradiction everyone will be able to relate to.

You might also check out This Star Won’t Go Out: The Life and Words of Esther Grace Earl, out at the end of January; John Green dedicated TFIOS to Esther Grace, who died at the age of 16 from cancer. As always, Don’t forget to join the HPB Book Club in reading The Fault in our Stars this month, and be on the look out for the movie, scheduled to be released this June. 

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Julie is Production Manager at Half Price Books Corporate.
You may follow her on Twitter at @auntjewey.