How I Came to Love the Audiobook

As a lifelong booklover and someone with a lit degree, I’d always thought of audiobooks as “not real books”. When my commute went from seven minutes to an hour and a half each way, I found myself bitter about the loss of free time to get in some reading. I got my first audiobook a few years back, Jenny Lawson’s Let’s Pretend This Never Happened. I rationalized in my mind “It’s a one-time thing. I just like her. It’s different because it’s her book she’s reading.” I couldn’t get over the “it’s not really reading” mentality. Then, keep the long commute and add a baby to the mix and watch the reading time dwindle even more. I got another audiobook… and then another.

Two years ago, I just embraced it. In the car is my go-to, but occasionally I’ll listen to a story while I’m working out or doing dishes – something where reading a “real” book isn’t an option. Audiobooks have helped me stay on top of – no that’s not right. I’ll NEVER be “on top” of my reading list; as is the case for most booklovers, my list grows faster than I can read or listen. Let’s go with, I’ve fallen less behind on my list of books to read. On top of my paper books, I’ve “read” about 50 audiobooks in the last couple of years, including entire series like The Dark Tower (and standalone novels that tie in to the series like Insomnia and The Stand), A Song of Ice and Fire (aka A Game of Thrones), and Outlander – all of which are fabulous and I would highly recommend.

Some of my favorites (in no order at all):

Ready Player One
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline; read by Wil Wheaton
This was so good, when it was over I put the first disc in again and started over. I wasn’t yet ready to leave the word of Parzival, Aech and Art3mis. Side note: Spielberg’s movie adaptation is due out early 2018. Continue reading