And the Prize Goes to… (Rarest of Rare Collectibles)

The Pulitzer Prize program was initiated in 1917. No award for fiction was given that first year, but prizes have been handed out in all but eleven years since 1918. The winner in 1918 was Ernest Poole, who won for His Family. Poole and quite a few other Fiction Pulitzer winners are all but forgotten now (our stores don’t get many requests these days for books by Margaret Wilson, Martin Flavin or Josephine Johnson—all Fiction prizewinners).

But other award-winning novels have stood the test of time and are on students’ reading lists and/or their parents’ must-read lists. Here we feature some collectible editions of Pulitzer Prize-winning fiction books which can be found on our shelves!

GoneWithTheWind

Gone With the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell
Macmillan, 1986. 50th Anniversary Edition.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1937

This anniversary edition of the timeless Civil War classic is in a slipcase that features a photograph of author Margaret Mitchell. It’s at our Cincinnati-Northgate store—$20.

 

GrapesOfWrath

The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck
Viking, 1939. First Edition, first issue.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1940

I had an Economics professor in college who was not long in the U.S. from India. One day in class, he began talking about The Grapes of Wrath. He raved about it being his favorite book, and by the end of that hour, he’d made reading it an assignment. I’m ever thankful for that. This copy is at our Maplewood, Minnesota store—$750.

 

OldManAndTheSea

The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway
Scribner, 1952. First Edition.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1953

Hemingway finally won the Pulitzer with this, the last of his novels published in his lifetime. It’s a nice, simple and mesmerizing tale. Our Flagship store in Dallas has it, $500.

 

ToKillAMockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
Lippincott, 1960. First Edition, fourth impression.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1961

First printings of this important novel are hard to come by at any price, but here’s a nice copy of an early printing of the American classic. It’s in our Apple Valley, Minnesota store for $200.

 

KillerAngels

The Killer Angels, by Michael Shaara
Easton Press Edition, 1996.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1975

Gorgeous illustrations by Mort Kunstler complement this classic story of the intense chaos that surrounded the battle of Gettysburg. This leather-bound copy of Shaara’s classic is at our Humble, Texas store for $120.

 

ConfederacyOfDunces

A Confederacy of Dunces, by John Kennedy Toole
First Grove Black Cat Edition, 1981.
Awarded the Pulitzer in 1981

Author Walker Percy wrote the foreword for this paperback edition. A decade after her son committed suicide, Toole’s mother gave this book to Percy, who had it published. Its protagonist, Ignatius J. Reilly, has become a cult hero. Our Flagship store has this for $7.50.

 

LonesomeDove

Lonesome Dove, by Larry McMurtry
Simon & Schuster Classic Edition, 2000. Signed by Larry McMurtry.
Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1986

Lonesome Dove is McMurtry’s most popular novel and is considered one of the best Westerns ever written. Tommy Lee Jones and Robert Duvall became icons as ex-Texas Rangers Gus and Call. This copy is signed by the author and is at our Flagship store for $250.

 

KavalierClay

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, by Michael Chabon
Random House, Second Printing, 2000. Inscribed by Michael Chabon.
Awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2001

This like-new inscribed copy of Chabon’s pop-culture saga is at our Austin-Parmer Crossing store— $100.

 

If you’re interested in any of these nice editions of important American fiction, contact the Buy Guy, or buy them online or in store.

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