Books Authors Read with Amy Poeppel

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Editor’s Note: Author Amy Poeppel will stop by our Dallas Flagship store on Thursday, March 2 at 7 p.m. to sign and discuss her debut novel Small Admissions. Amy is a native of Dallas, so we’re glad to hear she hasn’t forgotten her roots now that she’s hit the big time! J She’ll be joined by KERA’s Lee Cullum, so the evening is sure to be a treat for booklovers!

To gear you up for the event, we asked Amy to share some of the books she’s reading as we continue our “Books Authors Read” series. Thanks for sharing, Amy!

As a young woman, I spent many years reading novels by mostly dead authors, and I developed a great affection for the classics. As a writer, however, I find that I spend most of my time reading books by authors I have actually had the pleasure of meeting in real life… or hope to in the very near future. Here are some recent favorites by women authors who are alive and well!

The Nest. An absorbing family drama involving sibling relationships, marital drama and above all, money. This compelling novel by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney perfectly illustrates family chemistry and bitter resentments as the middle-aged Plumb brothers and sisters find that the personal decisions of one greatly impact and disrupt the lives of the others.

The Red Car. Such a surprising and wonderful book by Marcy Dermansky! This novel is written with such an original style that as a writer, I kept asking myself, “How did she do that??”  This is an intriguing story about a woman who is processing the death of a friend and while doing so, finds herself rethinking the life she has built for herself. The red car of the title is, in fact, a character in the book with a personality all its own.

Salvage The Bones. Beautifully written, this novel by Jesmyn Ward examines a family through the lead up to and in the middle of a disastrous hurricane in Mississippi. Community and sibling bonds are tested in the face of fear and hardship, and Ward shows the strength of humanity as characters cope with the high-stakes issues in their personal lives in the midst of an impending storm.

Stolen Beauty. “I was a love-struck newlywed when Hitler came to Austria.” This work of historical fiction by Laurie Lico Albanese delivers a wonderful read for any lover of art history. This novel, which has perhaps the most beautiful cover I’ve ever seen, depicts two women, Adele and her niece Maria, and the history behind the Gustav Klimt portrait that connects them through time. A World War II story detailing property confiscation by the Nazis, the book delivers intense emotion as both women find strength and determination in the face of injustice.

Caged Eyes. This memoir by a former Air Force Academy cadet, Lynn K. Hall, describes the events of her childhood and her time spent in the Air Force Academy where sexual assault destroys her dreams of becoming an Air Force pilot. Her story reveals the sexism built into the culture of the military and shows what happens when a rape goes unreported.

How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent. I just reread this beautiful debut novel, having loved it the first time many years ago. Julia Alvarez weaves together the stories of the Garcia sisters who have left the Dominican Republic for a life in New York City and find themselves belonging to two cultures. As the New York Times said, Alvarez captures “the experience of the new immigrant where the past is not yet a memory and the future remains an anxious dream.”

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